AGRARIANS - That New, Olde Timey Feele, Pt. II

Agrarians - That New, Olde Timey Feele, Pt. II

7 songs
23:00 minutes
***** ***
(DIY)

Bandpage

It had been awfully quiet around the Agrarians lately. Half year intervals between releases may seem very short for most other band, but this more or less solo project from Maryland has the reputation of treating his fans every one or two months with some new CD. Imagine my horror when I saw that this new CD was the second part of something of which I never even heard the first one. A little research on their Myspace site quickly appeased me, as That New, Olde Timey Feele, Pt. II is the precursor EP to the same titled album which will follow in a about a month. I seems that the Agrarians have recaptured their regular release schedule, and let’s not forget that project leader Matt Perzinski is also busy in many other bands, like Wonderful Wankerz who are also working on a new record.

The current seven song EP amounts to exactly twenty-three minutes and basically offers nothing new, except that most songs have several guitar tracks and even come with bass and percussion. This makes their indie folk pop more accessible to those not so acquainted with the lo-fi movement, and the short running time of the EP format therefore makes That New, Olde Timey Feele, Pt. II an ideal entry point for newcomers, while collectors will certainly be glad to know that the Agrarians are still delivering intense and introspective ballads that take much of their power from the piercing vocals.

In some ways, the Agrarians have much in common with artists of the outsider movement, like Syd Barrett and Daniel Johnston. With the later they share the never ending flow of good music that would be accessible to a much broader audience if they took the time to work longer on their material, give it more polish. But the question is: would they still keep their primeval charm that makes them so unique. After eleven reviews of Agrarians CDs, I am still and always again fascinated by their relentless, idiosyncratic approach.

Back to Reviews