APOLLINE - No Longer Rain

Apolline - No Longer Rain

11 songs
48:12 minutes
***** ***
M & O

Bandpage

The French band’s name sounds suspiciously like a brand of German mineral water, but actually they chose Apolline because they were founded on the name day of Pauline. This was about two years ago, and was soon followed by a self-released four track EP. This made such an impression on M & O who didn’t hesitate offering the band a record deal. Apolline come from the Loire region, which isn’t so far known for its rock culture, but maybe this is about to change now.

Apolline don’t like their music too complicated. Most of the time they play traditional rock music with a light retro touch reminding a little of the White Stripes. This is shown instantly on the opener Puck which was already one of the highlights of the preceding EP. It wouldn’t do Apolline any justice to dismiss them as a simple retro band. Occasionally elements of grunge, psychedelia and desert rock creep in, and the band isn’t afraid to name the Foo Fighters among their influences. Apolline also have a melancholic side which can be heard on their quieter tracks that remind me a little of Spookey Ruben. Only the two ballads can’t really convince me as they disturb the otherwise impeccable flow of the music. One of the band’s major strengths is vocalist Arthur whose voice has a vast register and who certainly doesn’t have to hide behind Muse’s Matthew Bellamy. I want to point out the eight minute long Shine which is concluding the album. On this epic track, the band once again summarises in a thrilling way all of what came before.

Another interesting topic is the choice of languages. French bands usually sing in either English or French. Apolline have eight English songs and three French ones, the latter succeeding each other. They don’t want to limit themselves to one single language and always opt for the one which works best for the song. This first longplayer is an excellent visiting card and I am already curious if No Longer Rain will achieve the success it deserves.

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