BOSCH’S WITH YOU - Dreams That Come A Thing (Part One: …Never Thought It May Seem…)

Bosch’s With You - Dreams That Come A Thing (Part One: …Never Thought It May Seem…)

6 songs
53:32 minutes
***** ****
RAIG

Bandpage

About a year ago, I was pleasantly surprised by the dreamlike postrock of Russian quartet Bosch’s With You. Their new project sees them from their ambitious side, working on a trilogy called Dreams That Come A Thing, of which the first part has just been released by RAIG Music. On the surface not much has changed with their sound, but a closer inspection reveals that there have been quite a few changes. First of all, the songs have become even longer. There may be six tracks on the CD, but in the end this amounts to only two songs. After a four minute long introspective opener, three episodes of the title track (a fourth one can be found on the second part of the trilogy) take up thirty-five minutes of the playing time. This magnum opus shows up Bosch’s With You from their known side, which means that they weave a tapestry of very slow moving and majestic postrock. Only in the middle, they leave the more rhythm oriented material for an excursion into Eno-like soundscapes. A wonderful delay-rich experience that should never end! The final two tracks, Hoarfrost (of which a third episode can also be found on the second part of the trilogy), end the album in a most sublime fashion. The short first part is an intro played on acoustic guitar, whereas the longer second movement takes the band radically away from postrock. Instead we get a full load of experimental ambient drone, which may not be up to everyone’s taste, but they excel so grandly, coming across like a less noisy Jackie-O Motherfucker, Windy & Carl and Richard Youngs that it must be a pleasure for every fan of minimal drone music. Especially the subdued acoustic guitar that adds a little melody in the middle makes for some variety.

Dreams That Come a Thing has Bosch’s With You matured and more varied than in the past. There may be only two compositions, but the sheer length of them makes them ideal to dive headfirst into their sonic tapestries and drown in the hallucinating instrumentals. Outstanding!

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