DISEN GAGE - The Screw-Loose Entertainment

Disen Gage - The Screw-Loose Entertainment

13 songs
51:27 minutes
***** ****
RAIG

Bandpage

It used to be an old cliché that bands from the former Soviet Union consisted of great musicians, because art was developed in a more focused way than in the West. Disen Gage from Moscow even go a step further, as they were also bio-organic chemists in their day jobs. You can't expect anything but highly intelligent rock music from these guys, and the opener Solaris from their debut album The Screw-Loose Entertainment (from 2004) makes me wonder. I always thought King Crimson only released three albums during their Eighties period, but this could be instrumental outtakes from a never published KC album. But to be fair, Disen Gage don't limit themselves to be inspired by Fripp's guitar sound and polyrhythmic complexity, they also are strongly rooted in fusion jazz, with especially the bass guitar creating an earthy sound, and the drums don't shy away from complicated percussive moments.

Unlike many instrumental bands, Disen Gage don't need ten minutes to play a song. In fact their pieces are all very compact and yet full of detail and beauty. Anything longer would probably ask too much attention of the listener. The regular part of the album contains ten songs that run for forty nervous minutes, full of highlights like the deliriously playful Augenapfel and the jazzy Jewboilove. Three live bonus tracks complete the album. The regular part can be downloaded for free on the band's homepage.

Let's face it. A band that call itself after a song from Robert Fripp's best solo effort (Exposure) has to sound like King Crimson, but Disen Gage are smart enough only to borrow elements of KC's rich sound and add their own textures to create their very own masterpiece. This is much better than guitar hero albums. This is playful music with emphasis on two duelling guitars that always let the song win over in the end. Absolutely recommended for fans of smart instrumental progressive music.

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