ENSIS - Overture (The Burning Shrine Of Hypocrisy)

Ensis - Overture (The Burning Shrine Of Hypocrisy)

4 songs
19:24 minutes
***** ***
(DIY)

Bandpage

Many people were devastated when Luxembourg eventually didn’t get an Ikea store. The good news is that at least we finally have our own Swedish death metal band, and we don’t even have to dig out the winter tires and drive to Scandinavia. But seriously now, it is a little weird to have the remnants of the band Tchaka recruiting people from Spyglass and Desiderata, all of them with a hardcore background, and attack the world with uncompromising Northern death metal.

Overture (The Burning Shrine Of Hypocrisy) starts with the unrelenting Neverending Battle, and continues with the equally pummelling Last Gulp and 2 Lovers, True Enemies, songs that established bands wouldn’t have done any better. Recorded at the true and tested Kulturfabrik studio, Ensis didn’t take any unnecessary risks, which is a good thing, as their debut EP has a truly outstanding sound. The guitars have a charming down-tuned quality and add enough harmonies to attract European death metal fans. The rhythm section, fast and furious, adds a little thrash momentum, and the vocals of the former Spyglass shouter have more of a screaming than growling texture. All of this puts the band into the comfortable territory of The Haunted and At The Gates.

It’s only with their concluding seven minute epic How To Love My Foolish Mind where Ensis dare to leave the trodden path, adding some slower parts and even a little emo moods, which fits them surprisingly well, taking them away from the preceding songs that we all were good but still lacked a little identity.

Overture (The Burning Shrine Of Hypocrisy) is a solid statement by a young band comprised of scene veterans, that seem to finally live up to their musical visions. If they can deliver a whole album with such great songs, especially like the final track, then there might be a new contender for Luxembourg’s extreme metal throne. Don’t let yourself miss this astounding debut.

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