FROST* - Milliontown

Frost* - Milliontown

6 songs
59:05 minutes
***** ****
InsideOut

Bandpage

Is this some kind of sick joke?, was my first thought after reading the info sheet for Frost*'s debut album Milliontown. Jem Godfrey is earning his money writing songs for Ronan Keating, Samantha Mumba and Atomic Kitten, then decided that he wants to make his own prog album, goes shopping for forty seminal prog rock CDs, assembles the best musicians that British prog has to offer (John Mitchell from Arena and Kino on guitars, IQ rhythm section Andy Edwards and John Jowitt) and just like this comes with an astonishing prog rock album that is much better than anything IQ have ever done.

Not satisfied by only placing himself between Marillion smartness and Spock's Beard heaviness, Milliontown sounds like a concept album from the Seventies recorded in the new millennium. The extensive instrumental Hyperventilate opens the album, before the hard rocking No Me No You shows that neo prog can be more than just wimped out Sunday afternoon pseudo musicians taking a break from their Government paid jobs. The short melancholic Snowman offers some arctic moments before The Other Me is again a more straightforward rocker. The ten minute epic Black Light Machine is only a glimpse of what to expect with the nearly half hour long title track that ends the album.

What makes Milliontown better than comparable albums? First of all the fact that no two songs sound alike. Frost* dare to write long songs, but have also two more commercial tracks if radio stations feel like playing their music. The vocals, shared between Godfrey and Mitchell, are simply excellent, possibly going sometimes too much into a Spock's Beard direction, but the utter progginess of the music makes you forget this little loss of originality. In the end Milliontown is a fantastic debut by a prog supergroup that may be too complex for neo proggies, but those firmly grounded in the Seventies roots will get much pleasure out of this epic masterpiece. Highly recommended!

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