THE GUILTY BROTHERS EXPERIENCE - TGBE!

The Guilty Brothers Experience - TGBE!

12 songs
57:29 minutes
***** ***
Stilll

Bandpage

Starting with a vaguely Indian sounding opening, The Guilty Brothers Experience from the Belgian capital Brussels show from the start that we’re in for something out of the ordinary. The first regular track, A Strange Valley Of Exile, heads deeply into a very retro sounding heavy psychedelic rock, strongly inspired by Led Zeppelin, not unlike early The Tea Party, but also not ignorant of current revivalists like The Mars Volta with whom the Belgians share vocal similarities.

TGBE! is the quintet’s first longplayer, coming two years after their EP Amadeus Archives. Instead of just putting together a couple of songs, The Guilty Brothers Experience are anything but predictable and have thus filled their album with all kinds of songs that all head into different direction. There is an intro and an outro, some more or less normal songs like the opener and Hesitation Of Icarus, some experimental bit and pieces in between, plus three long tracks between eight and twelve minutes in which the Belgians seem to feel truly at ease, alternating structures song parts with improvisational soloing. Not everything is perfect though, and I guess the band could have used less shaky female backing vocalists on As Guilty As Possible!, but it’s still bearable as it’s only three minutes long.

The Guilty Brothers Experience are certainly not doing anything new, as if that were even possible in the retro styled rock genre. But their unorthodox attitude is very refreshing, with especially the longer songs conjuring the spirit of the early Seventies when rock bands wrote songs for the song’s sake and not for potential radio airplay compatibility.

Coming with a short hour of pleasantly mind tingling psychedelic rock that moreover is not unaware of the current state of the music world, TGBE! is definitely a winner that should be savoured by fans of the aforementioned bands and everyone else who is tired of formulaic corporate rock.

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