REVOLTONS - Night Visions

Revoltons - Night Visions

10 songs
50:53 minutes
***** ****
Limb

Bandpage

Lately, when I see the logo of Limb Music, I always get scared in anticipation of another unnecessary true metal band. Too bad, as they were a label that used to release superior metal music. Luckily, once in a while, they sign bands that don't fit into the mould of standardised true metal clichés.

Italian metal has a good reputation, so it doesn't come totally as a surprise that Revoltons are way above average. Although they have been playing together already for more than 10 years, they only started writing own material in recent time, so that Night Visions is only their debut so far, and even their homepage (to which we link) doesn't even seem to work yet. But let's have a look at the music. After the typical uninteresting intro (why do metal bands seem to need that?), Cell Of Death takes you on a first rollercoaster ride. OK, I read already in the label info sheet that this is supposed to be progressive power metal, but in the past I have been cheated more than once. Anyway, Revoltons combine these two aforementioned styles in a perfect way, by combining the melodic virtuosity of power metal with the intricate rhythms of prog. This even goes further on the next track Hands Of Magellano, one of the wildest power prog songs I have heard in a long time. If high pitched vocals disturb you, this is the moment to switch off your stereo, but those of you into melodic metal will come to like the dramatic melody encased in the complex song structure. A true masterpiece. The short instrumental Before The Dawn and the long half-ballad Malcolm's Drama give you time to relax a bit, but apart from that, it's this ingenious symbiosis of beautiful melodies and mind-bending instrumental skills.

True metal purists will get their fingers burned on the amount of originality and quality presented here, but those who see themselves more in the Dream Theater and Fates Warning school of things will more than appreciate Night Visions.

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