SACRED STEEL - Carnage Victory

Sacred Steel - Carnage Victory

11 songs
51:34 minutes
***** ***
Massacre

Bandpage

All of the band members had already been active in the music business for quite some time before the started Sacred Steel in 1996. Their debut Reborn In Steel from 1997 instantly hit like a bomb. Since then a metal scene without them was unimaginable, and their seventh album Carnage Victory won’t change that either.

The fast opener Charge Into Overkill knows to amaze instantly. Sacred Steel are showing off their harder side that reminds me a little of thrash heroes Living Death from the Eighties. The song is brimming with energy, and especially the pounding drums are exceptionally impressive. Clichés and pathos are used willingly in abundance, creating a sense of humour that benefits the band’s sound. This is followed by the great Don’t Break The Oath, although not a Mercyful Fate cover version, it is definitely a homage to King Diamond’s legendary band. The interaction between high and low vocals works splendidly, underlining once again that Gerrit P. Mutz is one of the most versatile metal vocalists. With a touch of doom without forfeiting any of its power comes the title track which somewhat reminds me of Candlemass. Broken Rites displays finest virtuoso guitar playing we are used to normally only from Iron Maiden, succeeded by the two classic power metal tracks Crossed Stained With Blood and Ceremonial Magician Of The Left Hand Path that both come with aggressive thrash parts. The Skeleton Key and Denial Of Judas are two wonderfully structured power metal songs that are separated by a short ethno instrumental. Metal Underground is somewhat simpler with a dragging pace, before the album ends ultra-brutally with By Vengeance And Hatred We Ride.

Sacred Steel have crafted an excellent album full of variety. Furthermore the band sounds currently harder than in their early days, which is a welcome development. Sacred Steel still sound fresh and I am certain that they have many aces up their sleeve for the future.

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