SILVERSTEIN - Arrivals & Departures

Silverstein - Arrivals & Departures

11 songs
42:06 minutes
***** **
Victory

Bandpage

It’s one of my customs to review Silverstein album only in the month of August, as it is one of their customs to release every two years a new album for the upcoming summer (not that I notice much of it, despite the global warming). Last year, Silverstein rather bored me to tears with the re-release of their early demos, so I was really looking forward to their third regular album in five years. The cover artwork is excellent as always, but the sobering came soon afterwards. Arrivals & Departures is by no means a bad album, but it is disappointing considering the fact that the Canadians produced two milestones with their first two albums. The new album just delivers more of the same, showing Silverstein from a conservative mood we normally only accept from bands like AC/DC. Except for the rather bland and too long ballad True Romance that concludes the album (and giving you an opportunity to push the stop button nearly six minutes before the end) and the more radio-friendly single If You Could See Into My Soul, there’s mostly typical emo fare, meaning sweet melodies with surprisingly more screamo parts than I would have anticipated and even wanted. So that’s maybe a return to their hardcore roots, but with so many other bands doing right now exactly the same, I would have wished to see Silverstein move to a more poppy territory. Even if their new album is still engaging during the first couple of tracks, Silverstein make the mistake of reusing over and over the same template, making eventually for a rather wearisome CD.

Arrivals & Departures is an album any other band could be rather proud of, but for someone like Silverstein who helped develop the movement of melodic emo punk, it’s rather tragic to see them stuck in the same, old routines, with bands like Bayside or June getting easily ahead of them. Let’s hope that in August 2009, I can say nicer things about a fourth Silverstein release.

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