USSSY - USSSY

USSSY - USSSY

11 songs
65:03 minutes
***** *
RAIG

Bandpage

Consisting of three-quarter of Russian mathcore band I Am Above On The Left, USSSY go one step further to play avant-core, which in this case means mostly brutally fast noise eruptions performed on guitar, baritone guitar and drums. The barked vocals lead some sort of secret life in the background, giving the music (if you dare use this term) a mostly instrumental feeling.

Their label is normally better known for releasing psychedelic bands with an experimental, improvised or avant-garde feeling, and although it feels at first as if USSSY don’t fit the general roster, a closer inspection shows that they are not that different, only using a much harder and distorted approach. The CD starts with rather short tracks, that become even shorter in the middle. Only later on they dare combine their extreme take on music with longer structures, and guess what? This is where they work best. This can especially be witnessed on the twelve minute long Wire, a tour de force that combines grindcore styled guitar attacks with more meditative sounds, just to end in an even wilder noise orgy. The nineteen minute Adieu, Thrush! which concludes the album ends unfortunately in a long, repetitive and mostly uninteresting drone.

USSSY can be applauded for their fearless approach of experimental noise music, but that doesn’t change the fact that their debut album is an extremely inaccessible album. Unlike regular grindcore bands that rely on straight riff sequences, this three-piece lets you only expect the unexpected. Like free jazz played on electric guitars, the Russians claim your undivided attention to get the most out of their avant-core ruminations. There is a lot of virtuosity hidden inside their tangled ideas. This is all very demanding, anything but easy to consume and definitely not the right soundtrack to make you drive calmly in your car. Adventurous noise fans should risk an ear, the more conventional music lovers better make a wide detour around this debut.

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